Blogoshpere updates from the Darfur crisis

A couple notable developments from the Darfur. The first is a news item (hat tip to Gabrielle Grow of the Institute for War and Peace Reporting office in The Hague, Netherlands), the Sudanese government is relocating thousands of IDPs within Darfur because of security concerns:

The recent turmoil started in late July when demonstrations by opponents of peace talks with the government turned violent. Backers of the Sudan Liberation Army, SLA, clashed with supporters of the talks currently taking place in Doha. Several deaths were reported in the violence.

“The problem is that weapons are flowing all over the place, not just in the camps but outside,” Russia’s UN ambassador Vitaly Churkin, who currently chairs the Security Council, said following a meeting on the situation.

The Sudanese government says the planned move is being undertaken for security reasons as well as because of the camp’s proximity to an airport and railway lines.

The second is a study undertaken last year of displaced Darfur refugees  (in Chad) carried out by the group 24 Hours for Darfur.

The US-based non-profit research organization spent four months in the 12 Darfurian refugee camps in eastern Chad, interviewing 1872 randomly-sampled civilians and 280 civil society and rebel leaders. The data gathered from the civilian sample is representative of the adult refugee population in Chad, and sheds light on important questions about participants’ specific beliefs about the root causes of the conflict, past peace negotiations and agreements for Darfur and southern Sudan, the nature and importance of justice in bringing about a sustainable peace, the possibility of reconciliation, land-related issues, democracy, power-sharing, and the national elections, and which actors, if any, best represent their views.

I was in Chad at the same time as the folks who put this project together. They had assembled an impressive group of interpreters and interviewers (so impressive, in fact, it was tough to find good interpreters for anyone else!). Connect to the report via Jonathan Loeb’s blog (Jonathan was one of the organizers of the study).

Advertisements

1 Response to “Blogoshpere updates from the Darfur crisis”


  1. 1 Kris September 27, 2010 at 1:42 pm

    The suffering hasn’t stopped in Darfur and people really need to see this. Uwe Boll’s new flick Attack on Darfur should really open people’s eyes, I heard its pretty brutal but pretty honest.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




September 2010
M T W T F S S
« Aug   Oct »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

%d bloggers like this: